Poole Harbour Bird Boat 13 February 2016

The boat leaves Poole Quay at 10.30 am, returning at 1.00 pm.  RSPB New Forest Local Group members should make sure they arrive by 10.10 am at the latest to allow time to sort out tickets and board the boat.  Please meet by the Baden-Powell statue on Poole Quay.  Suggested parking is in Poole Quay Visitors multi-storey in Strand Street/Castle Street, BH15 1HH, which costs £3.50 for 4 hours parking (Map ref: SZ011903; co-ordinates: 50.712981N, 1.9857372W).  If you have not yet paid, please send cheque payable to RSPB New Forest Local Group to Tani or Tony.

If you are a member of Hampshire and IoW Wildlife Trust take your membership card to allow free access to the Dorset Wildlife Trust reserve on Brownsea Island.

This is what RSPB says about the trip, which is now sold out:

Poole Harbour Bird Boats showcase the 2nd largest harbour in the world; Poole harbour, its Islands and the wildlife that depends on it. These boats are a unique opportunity to see one of the best winter bird spectacles in the UK and gain exclusive access to the famous Brownsea Island. Poole Harbour Bird Boats is a partnership between Dorset Wildlife Trust, National Trust and RSPB.

Our Harbour Cruise boat trips take in some of the quieter corners of the harbour hopefully getting us close to the wildlife that spend the winter here. The harbour boasts the largest flock of avocet and spoonbill in the UK, large numbers of birds of prey including marsh and hen harrier, peregrine falcon and merlin as well as most of the UK’s diver and grebe species. It’s a fantastic trip!

 

Courses on insect identification

At a recent survey or RSPB New Forest Local Group members, 54% indicated an interest in courses on identification of species other than birds. Hampshire Cultural Trust, which was formerly part of Hampshire County Council Museums Service, hold a number of workshops each year on insect identification.  These include the use of keys in identifying specimens from the museums extensive collection, using microscopes and some field identification if conditions allow.  The following are in the workshop programme for 2016: Bumblebees, Solitary bees and wasps, Ladybirds and Shieldbugs and Leatherbugs.  The workshop programme is popular and they do get booked up, but places are still available on these workshops.  Click the species names above to get further details.

Hampshire Cultural Trust would also be prepared to arrange a tour of their collections for us, including their birds, and give us a talk on the importance of and rationale behind the collections.

Forthcoming meetings

The next indoor meeting  of the RSPB New Forest Local Group on Wednesday,       10 February 2016 will feature an illustrated talk by Dr Andy Barker on the “Butterflies of Hampshire”.  Andy is a senior tutor in Ocean Sciences at the National Oceanography Centre at Southampton University. He was born and brought up on a working farm, where a life-long passion for butterflies, moths, and conservation began. Actively involved with Butterfly Conservation at local, regional and national level since 1985. Particular interests include butterfly surveys, monitoring and management of chalk grasslands. He currently Chairs the National Conservation Strategy Committee, and has extensive experience of working with volunteers.  The meeting will, as usual, be in the Linden Room at Lyndhurst Community Centre and start at 7.30 pm, doors open from 7.00 pm.  Local group members £1.50, others £3.50 entrance.

The illustrated talk on the following meeting on Wednesday, 9 March 2016 will be by Paul Toynton on the “History and Wildlife of Martin Down”.  Paul was formerly warden of Martin Down and has extensive experience of the management of chalk grassland for the conservation of wildlife.  Please note that this meeting will be in the Pine Room at Lyndhurst Community Centre and start at 7.30 pm, doors open from 7.00 pm.  Local group members £1.50, others £3.50 entrance.

Ask MEPs to defend nature

The EU Nature Directives – vital laws that protect our most vulnerable wildife and places – are being reviewed, and there’s political pressure to weaken them.

We’ve been fighting back, and it’s working. Last year 520,000 people made the biggest EU consultation response ever. In December, Environment Ministers from each EU country acknowledged the importance of these crucial laws in reversing nature losses.

Now we need our MEPs to stand with us too, and send a clear message that:

1. They know nature protection matters to their constituents

2. These strong and effective laws are our best tool to reverse wildlife declines

3. We should be focusing on putting them properly into practice, not changing them

4. They know nature protection matters to their constituents

5. These strong and effective laws are our best tool to reverse wildlife declines

6. We should be focusing on putting them properly into practice, not changing them

To email you MEP click HERE!